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Charlotte Clippers

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The Charlotte Clippers was a professional football team in the Dixie League, a professional football league founded in 1936. The Charlotte franchise was born in 1941, when the city was selected to field a team to replace a struggling franchise in Washington, D.C. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium.

In their first season, the Clippers did well, posting a 7 - 3 record. They put up a record 184 points that season (almost 30 higher than the previous record). The Clippers finished in second place that season behind the Richmond Arrows.

In 1942, the Dixie League (and many other sports leagues around the nation) ran into a problem. With the attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States' entry into World War II, young men weren't available to play sports - they were enlisting. The league had no option but to suspend operations for the duration of the war.

In the spring of 1946, the Dixie League announced plans to reorganize that fall. American troops were returning home, and players were readily available. At the same time, two other football leagues, the American Association and the Pacific Coast Football League, were making similar plans for revitalization. In March of 1946, these three leagues would form "minor leagues" that were actually recognized by the NFL, greatly improving player quality.

The Charlotte Clippers again fielded a dominant team, and battled the Richmond Rebels (formerly the Arrows) neck and neck all season long. Richmond would lose its final two games of the season though, putting Charlotte in the top spot. The Clippers would have a 9 - 1 record that season, while the Rebels finished 7 - 3. There was no playoff that year, so the Clippers were declared champions. 1947, the league was again preparing for another successful year. Just one week before the season however, two teams withdrew from the league. The league was exploring expansion at the time, so they didn't see this as a major problem. After the first week though, one more team left the division, jumping to the AFL. At this point, the Dixie League has no choice but to stop operations. Of the three teams remaining, two merged, and both those teams played as independents.

The Charlotte Clippers kept going playing 1949, picking up games where they could find them, and actually fielding good teams each year. Ownership hoped to be able to join the AFL, but that never happened.

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