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Haunted Locations in Charlotte

The Queen City's Most Spirited Sites

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If you’re in the middle of Uptown Charlotte, amidst the shimmering glass and steel, it’s easy to forget that the city dates back to the 1760s. With a city that's over 250 years old, there's plenty of history.

There are several other sites with “ghost stories” of their own, but for this list, I tried to stick to the well-know places with multiple claims of the same sighting. If you’re actually looking to see a ghost though, you’d probably be better off heading to a haunted house during the fall, or a local costume shop. Even if you check out every place on this list, there’s no guarantee you’d see anything. But just because you didn’t see anything on one visit, that doesn’t mean there’s no activity.

Many “haunted” sites are just local folklore with a bit of history thrown in as the starting point. But when multiple people over multiple time periods have consistent stories, there may be something to it. Here's where you'll find Charlotte's most haunted places.

Know of any other good sites? Let me know at charlotte@aboutguide.com, or on Facebook.

Just looking for some Halloween fun? Check out the complete list of dozens of "haunted houses" and corn mazes in the Charlotte area.

1. Founders Hall

Founders Hall sits on the site of what was formerly Founders College. At the time, it was against the law for medical colleges to purchase corpses for anatomical research, so they sometimes had to resort to good old-fashioned grave robbing. The story goes that a young girl named Louise passed away in nearby Salisbury, and her body was transported here shortly after her death. Louise apparently didn’t appreciate her body being sliced into and analyzed by students, and she still visits the area from time to time. It is worth noting though, that the body of Louise has also been reported to be sold to the medical school at Duke University, where this same legend is told.

2. Old Fire Station #4

Charlotte Fire Station Number 4 was built in 1925, and it's now a fire museum. While it's not a functioning firehouse, the building may still be the home of a firefighter named Pruitt L. Black. On April 1, 1934, Pruett was heading out to respond to a fire. As he rushed to get ready on the second story of the fire house, he headed for the pole to slide down. He tripped on his bunker pants, fell into the hole, and dropped from the top floor to the ground, fatally fracturing his skull. The station is open for touring, and people say they’ll sometimes smell cigar smoke, even though there’s not a lit stogie around.

3. Spirit Square and McGlohan Theatre

The first building in the location where the McGlohan Theatre sits now was a church built in the late 1800s. The present building was erected in 1903, and served as a church until the city of Charlotte took it over in the early 1950s. Theater employees working in the basement have reported hearing faint singing in the theater above them, and have heard the sound of footsteps when the theater is closed and there’s nobody else in the building.

4. Queens University

The campus of Queens University plays host to several speculated spirits. Albright Residence Hall is said to by a woman who committed suicide in the dorm. The door to the room where she lived reportedly flies open on its own, and students have heard someone or something knocking on the walls inside. Students in Wallace Residence Hall have also reported strange activity in a specific dorm, from cold spots in a corner room, and to strange clanging and knocking noises. The main courtyard on campus is allegedly haunted by the spirits of several Civil War era soldiers. Students have heard screaming on the grounds, and have seen an apparition of a body hanging from a tree.

5. Latta Plantation

Latta Plantation, now a historic site, was formerly the home of the Latta family. Some say they never left the site. Employees have reported that during tours, they’ll hear the sounds of children playing and running in the attic. In the actual family home, doors will slam shut on their own, and strange shadows can be seen.

6. Kennedy's Premium Bar and Grill

Kennedy's Premium Bar and Grill was a former farm house a long time ago, and it appears that its residents may not have moved on. While many hauntings have tragic stories that accompany them, this isn’t one. Nevertheless, employees of the restaurant have heard doors opening and closing, and radios turning on and off when nobody else is in the building. CAPS (the Charlotte Area Paranormal Society) recently conducted an investigation at the site and determined that, in their opinion, the building is haunted.

7. Overcash House

At the intersection of 8th and Pine in Uptown, you’ll find the Overcash House. Build in 1876, the house is said to be haunted by the ghost of a woman who broke her neck after she fell down the steps to her death. Much like the “ghost light” at many theater, there’s a candle that burns all day, every day in the turret to provide light for her.

8. Ri-Ra Irish Pub

The actual bar in Ri-Ra Irish pub can be traced to Ireland in the early 1800s. Employees have numerous stories about cold spots in certain areas, and visions of men in period dress walking around. Be sure to ask the employees about the alphabet written in chalk on the upstairs wall.

9. Carolina Theatre

Although just the outside shell remains, the Carolina Theater still holds its share of stories. Constructed in 1927. A former caretaker of the theater recounted incidents where he once saw a man standing on the stage – even though he was in the building by himself. Another time (when he was again by himself), he heard something up in the balcony, and looked up to see a man standing in the front of balcony staring down at him. There have also been strange problems with light bulbs burning out – often ones that have been replaced just days prior - and other mechanical problems that can't be explained.

10. The Dunhill Hotel

The Dunhill is one of Uptown’s oldest buildings, opening in 1929 as Mayfair Manor. In one certain room, employees claim they get strange feeling, just describing it as “something that runs up your spine.” The hotel did see several suicides during the Great Depression.

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